CareerMilitary

Military Myths

While there’s a wealth of information out there about joining the military, there’s also a wealth of MISinformation. Cpl. Krista E. James, a Marine specializing in marketing and communications, debunks some of the most common myths about military service.

While there’s a wealth of information out there about joining the military, there’s also a wealth of MISinformation. Cpl. Krista E. James, a Marine specializing in marketing and communications, debunks some of the most common myths about military service.

MYTH: Bootcamp is designed to make you fail.

False. Recruit training is designed to break down the old version of recruits and mold them into well-disciplined members of the military. Recruits learn the value of teamwork and leadership, straying from a, “What’s in it for me?” mentality into a, “How can I help the team?” mentality. Recruits in training are taught to walk with their heads held high, to lend a helping hand to those in need, to thrive in today’s society with respect, leadership, discipline and integrity, and to serve their country.

MYTH: All military service members have to go to war and fight.

False. While it is a Marine’s duty to serve their country, whether in a war-zone or in a peaceful atmosphere, there are many Marines who have never seen combat. I myself was on a non-combat deployment for six months on the Black Sea Rotational Force in Mihail Kogalniceanu, Romania. Our primary job was crisis contingency, not fighting a war. We spent our time there strengthening relationships with partner nations in the region.

MYTH: What you learn in the military has no applicability to life outside of the service.

False. There are many Military Occupational Specialties (MOS’) in the Marine Corps that translate into the civilian world. We have jobs in fields such as administration, communications, electronics maintenance, legal services, music, aircraft maintenance, and many others that can all translate into the civilian world. When I joined the Marine Corps, I was in public affairs. Now that I’m in Alabama at a Recruiting Station, I do marketing and communications. I’m 25 years old and I have a ton of responsibility. Many people think we are just taking young adults and sending them off to war, but we are actually preparing them to be great leaders in the community, and teaching them invaluable lessons at a very early age so they can be as successful as possible.

MYTH: Going into the military forfeits your chance to get a college education.

False. We have many resources, such as the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps Scholarship, that allow recipients to get a college education and then serve their country as an officer. We also provide tuition assistance. That means Marines can serve their country, receive benefits like medical and dental, and still go to school free of charge. After their time-in-service has ended, Marines can still utilize their GI Bill. This bill provides up to 36 months of education benefits, to include a housing allowance. The Marine Corps is dedicated to the overall advancement of our Marines.

WOMEN IN THE SERVICE

I’ve heard things that range from, “I didn’t know women were in the Marine Corps,” to, “There’s no way females do the same things males do.” Female recruits go through the same training as male recruits do. Our Marine Corps Recruit Training schedule directly reflects that of the males. Females are even allowed to join the infantry, and they only make it to graduation for their specific job field if they can perform the same tasks as the males. Women in the Marine Corps are among the fewer and prouder, and make up only about eight percent of this elite force.

Leave a Response

Top Reviews

Video Widget

gallery